Are you a series keeper? Unfortunately, these days most of us tend to be. When you lead an inactive lifestyle where you spend a lot of time – professionally or personally – sitting, your posture and possibly your health suffer the most. We drive to work to sit at our desks to go home and relax by sitting on our couches.

A few tips to keep in mind before you get started:

  • Try to maintain each stretch for at least 10 seconds and preferably 30 seconds or more.
  • The benefits of pain relief will increase the longer you maintain these stretches.
  • Remember to breathe! It may sound silly, but it will help you feel any discomfort.

1. Bridges

bridges
The bridges act on the maximum buttocks of a person, which is the large buttock muscle. People engage this muscle when they move their hips, especially when they are squatting.
The maximus glute is one of the most important muscles in the body, and keeping it strong can help support the lower back.
To make a bridge:

  • Lie on the floor and bend your knees, placing your feet flat on the floor at hip-width.
  • Press your feet on the ground, keeping your arms to the sides.
  • Lift the buttocks off the ground until the body forms a straight line from the shoulders to the knees.
  • Tighten the buttocks with the shoulders remaining on the floor.
  • Lower your buttocks to the floor and rest for a few seconds.
  • Repeat 15 times, then rest for 1 minute.
  • Do 3 sets of 15 repetitions.

2. Knee-to-chest stretches

Stretching from the knee to the chest can help lengthen the lower back, relieving tension and pain.
To stretch from the knee to the chest:

  • Lie on your back on the floor.
  • Bend your knees, keeping both feet flat on the floor.
  • Hold the knee against the chest for 5 seconds, keeping the abs tight and pressing the spine into the ground.
  • Return to the starting position.
  • Repeat with the opposite leg.
  • Repeat with each leg 2 to 3 times twice a day.

3. Lower back rotational stretches

Lower back rotational stretches
Rotational lower back stretching can help relieve tension in the lower back and trunk.
To perform the stretching of the lower back in rotation:

  • With your knees bent and your feet flat on the floor, lie on the floor.
  • Keeping your shoulders firmly on the floor, gently roll your two knees bent to one side.
  • Hold for 5-10 seconds.
  • Return to the starting position.
  • Gently roll the bent knees to the opposite side, hold them there, then return to the starting position.
  • Repeat 2 to 3 times on each side twice a day.

4. Draw-in maneuvers

Draw-in maneuvers
The pulling maneuver works on the transverse abdomen. This muscle is located in the front and side of the abdomen, stabilizing the spine and lower back.
To perform the reconciliation maneuver:

  • Keeping your arms sideways, lie on the floor with your knees bent and your feet flat.
  • Take a deep breath.
  • While exhaling, pull the navel toward the spine, tightening the abdominal muscles and keeping the hips still.
  • Hold the position for 5 seconds.
  • Repeat 5 times.

5. Pelvic tilts

Pelvic tilts
This exercise can relieve you in tight back muscles and keep them flexible.
To perform this lower back flexibility exercise:

  • Keeping the arms by the sides, lie back on the floor with knees bent and feet flat.
  • Arch the lower back and stomach out.
  • Hold for 5 seconds, then relax.
  • Flatten the back and pull the belly button.
  • Hold for 5 seconds, then relax.

6. Lying lateral leg lifts

Lying lateral leg lifts
The lateral lifts of the extended legs work the abductor muscles of the hip. These muscles support the pelvis and can help reduce tension on the back.
Keeping these muscles strong is essential, as they help a person maintain balance and can affect mobility.
To perform lateral lifts of the extended legs:

  • Lie on one side with your legs together.
  • Keep the lower leg slightly bent.
  • Pull the navel in the spine to engage the core muscles.
  • Lift the upper leg about 18 inches, keeping it straight and elongated.
  • Hold the position for 2 seconds.
  • Repeat 10 times.
  • Turn to the other side of the body and repeat, lifting the other leg.
  • Perform 3 sets on each side.

7. Cat stretches

Cat stretches
Stretching the cat can help lengthen the back, make it stronger and relieve muscle tension.
To stretch the cat:

  • Put yourself on your hands and knees with your knees apart at hip width.
  • Arch your back by pulling the navel toward the spine.
  • Slowly relax the muscles and let the abdomen sag towards the floor.
  • Return to the starting position.
  • Repeat 3 to 5 times twice a day.

8. Supermans

Supermans
A person needs strong back extenders to maintain good posture.
Weak back extensors can reduce support for the spine and pelvis, but doing an exercise called “Superman” can help.
To run a Superman:

  • Lie face down on the floor and stretch both arms in front of your body, keeping your legs straight and flat on the floor.
  • Lift your hands and feet to create a space of about 6 inches between them and the floor.
  • Try to pull the navel by lifting it from the ground to engage the core muscles.
  • Keep your head straight and look at the ground to avoid neck injuries.
  • Stretch your hands and feet outward as much as possible.
  • Hold the position for 2 seconds.
  • Return to the starting position.
  • Repeat 10 times.

9. Seated lower back rotational stretches

Seated lower back rotational stretches
Rotating stretching of the lower back helps to relieve pain, work the core muscles and strengthen the lower back.
To perform the stretching rotation of the lower back sitting:

  • Sit on a stool or armless chair, keeping your feet flat on the floor.
  • Turn center to the right, keeping your hips straight and your spine high.
  • Place the hands behind the head or position the left hand on the right knee to support the stretch.
  • Hold for 10 seconds.
  • Repeat the exercise on the left side.
  • Repeat on each side 3 to 5 times twice a day.

10. Partial curls

Partial curls
Strong abdominal muscles play an important role in supporting the spine and can also help keep the hips properly aligned.
Weak abs can cause poor core strength and lack of stability, which can cause lower back pain. Loops and partial loops help build a solid core.
To perform partial loops:

  • Lie on the floor and bend your knees, keeping your feet flat and hip-width apart.
  • Cross your hands over your chest.
  • Take a deep breath.
  • At the expiration, engage the abdominal muscles by pulling on the stomach.
  • Gently lift your head and shoulders 2 inches from the floor while keeping your neck aligned with your spine.
  • Return to the starting position after holding for 5 seconds.
  • Repeat the exercise 10 times.
  • Perform 3 sets.

Stretches to Help Back Pain

Knee To Chest

Use this stretch to align the pelvis and stretch the lower back and back muscles. With your toes pointed upward, lie on your back. Slowly bend your right knee. Pull your leg up to your chest. Wrap your arms around your thigh, knee or shin and gently pull the knee toward your chest. Hold for 20 seconds and slowly extend your leg to the starting position. Repeat each leg three times.

Trunk rotation stretch

Stretching: start lying on the mat with your knees bent. While keeping your upper back flat on the floor, rotate your legs toward the floor until a stretch is felt. Repeat the stretch on the opposite side.
Why it works: This stretch helps improve the mobility of the spine while relaxing the muscles on the sides of the trunk.

Child’s pose

Stretch: Start on all fours. Sit your hips back while stretching your arms forward until a slight stretch is felt in the back.
Why it works: This stretch helps improve the mobility of the spine while relaxing the lower back muscles.

Cat-camel back stretch

Stretch: Start on all fours. Arch your back towards the ceiling and hold on. Then arch your back to the ground and hold.
Why it works: This stretch helps maintain mobility in the spine while strengthening the back and abdominal muscles.

Hamstring stretch

Stretching: start to sit on the floor with one leg straight and the other bent. While maintaining a flat back, lean forward, articulating the hip until a stretch is felt behind the thigh. Repeat on the other leg.
Why it works: When you spend most of your time sitting, the back of your legs tighten. This would cause back traction when bending forward. Having flexible hamstrings reduces stress in the back with bending and lifting activities.

Hip flexor stretch

Stretching: start by kneeling on a mat. Lean forward toward the bent front knee until a stretch in front of the opposite thigh is felt.
Why it works: When you spend most of your time sitting, the front of your hips tighten. This would cause the hip muscles to pull the lower back forward while standing, thus increasing stress in the lower back. Increased flexibility of the hip flexors will help reduce back pain in standing activities.

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